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FLL Animal Allies: Climbing the Bio-mimicry Wall with Robot

Animal Allies Logo
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After setting my new 2017 group of FIRST LEGO Leage (FLL) Students the “Bio-mimicry Wall Climbing Task” from the 2016 Animal Allies Challenge, I thought I should prove that it is possible to achieve. The Bio-mimicry Wall Climbing Task requires having the Robot lift its self up upon a wall with no part of the Robot touching the Challenge Mat. Easier than it sounds…

Preforming the Polygon Shuffle with a EV3 Gyroscope

EV3-G
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A polygon is any 2-dimensional shape formed with straight lines. Triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, and hexagons are all examples of polygons. The name tells you how many sides the shape has. A polygon is any shape made up of straight lines that can be drawn on a flat surface, like a piece of paper. Such shapes include squares, rectangles, triangles and pentagons, but not circles or any other shape that includes a curve.

There are two main types of polygon – regular and irregular. A regular polygon has equal length sides with equal angles between each side. Any other polygon is an irregular polygon, which by definition has unequal length sides and unequal angles between sides.

geometric-shapes-polygons-sides-worksheet

Using the TCS230/TCS3200 Color Sensor with an Arduino

TCS3200 Color Sensor Module
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In this article I will endeavour to show how to detect colours with an Arduino connected to the TCS230/TCS3200 colour sensor.

The TCS3200 colour sensor can detect a wide variety of colours based on their wavelength. This sensor is specially useful for colour recognition projects such as colour matching, colour sorting, test strip reading and much more.

Getting Started with the LEGO Mindstorms & the PixyCAM

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I trust this article will get you up an running quickly with PixyCAM and the LEGO Mindstorms EV3 (NXT). Please make sure you have a LEGO Mindstorms EV3 or NXT brick with a fresh set of batteries. I will endeavor to be as detailed as possible throughout this guide, but it helps if you are somewhat familiar on how to use your LEGO Mindstorms Robotics System.

Using the ‘Google Cloud Vision API’ with your Raspberry Pi

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What is the ‘Google Cloud Vision API’?

Google Cloud Vision API enables your robot to understand the content of an image by encapsulating powerful machine learning models in an easy to use REST API. It quickly classifies images into thousands of categories such as “robot”, “elephant”, “flower”. It detects individual objects and faces within images. It capable of finding and reading printed words contained within images, and even determines the language it is written in. You can use it to build metadata for your image collection, and can be used to moderate offensive content through image analysis.
The Vision API enables you to detect different types of inappropriate content from adult to violent content. It analyzes images uploaded by the request, or integrate with your image storage on Google Cloud Storage.

Using WS2812B Addressable RGB LED Strips with Arduinos

WS2812B LED Strip
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This article is about my experiments with the WS2812B LED strip, which is an addressable RGB LED strip. This information should also work with other similar LED strips, such as strips of the WS28XX family, Neopixel strip, among others. The WS2812B addressable LED strip comes in several varieties that differ in size, sealant or LED density. Choose the one that best fits your purpose.

Stability Issues with Building the T-R3X Dinosaur

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I was having stability issues with Daniel Benedettelli’s T-R3X Dinosaur robot as featured in his book: THE LEGO MINDSTORMS EV3 LABORATORY. When he walked he was quite unstable, especially during turns, or long straight runs where he suffered from the speed wobbles. I build him to entertain some lower Primary School Students, so I had to get him stable on his pins to avoid thier bad press.

Using a 0.96 inch OLED Display with Arduino Microcontroller

0.96" OLED Display
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In this article I will show how to use the small 0.96 inch OLED display with an Arduino Microcontoller board to build a very basic Weather Station.

Introduction to using the BMP180 barometric sensor with Arduino

bmp180 barometricsensor
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The BMP180 barometric sensor (model GY-68) in the following two images is a very small module with 10mm x 10.1mm (0.039in x 0.043in) footprint. This guide is also applicable for other similar barometric sensors.

Using the HC-SR04 Ultrasonic Sensor with Arduino

HC-SR04
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The working principle of an ultrasonic sensor is simple and use high-frequency sound waves that are evaluated when the sensor received back the waves. To determine the distance between the robot and object, the sensor measure the elapsed time between sending and receiving the waves.

Using a Membrane Keypad with an Arduino

Membrane Keypad
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With this tutorial, you will be learn to access any keypad, and have it interact with a microcontroller. You can salvage these keypads from old telephones or you can purchase them from most electronics store for less than $2. They come in wide variety of shapes and sizes. The most commons sizes are 3×4 and 4×4, and you can get keypads with with words, letters and numbers written on the keys.

Programming the BeagleBone Black with Python

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Building a surveillance system with a PIR sensor, the BeagleBone Black and Python.

The BeagleBone Black is an outstanding tool for projects that involve the Internet. Access is easy (simply connect it to the router through an Ethernet cable ), and both Python and JavaScript feature libraries that greatly simplifies matters.

Programming with BoneScript on the BeagleBone Black

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This Article introduces BoneScript, a Node.js library containing functions specially created for the BeagleBone Black. This library simplifies the process of accessing and configuring the pins of your BeagleBone Black.

Controlling an output, reading a button/sensor, controlling a motor are quite easy with BoneScript. If you used an Arduino before, you’ll find most functions very similar.

Getting Started with the BeagleBone ‘Black’

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This Article was written by Rui Santos and Luís Perestrelo authors of BeagleBone For Dummies.

Introduction

BeagleBone BlackThe BeagleBone Black is a low-cost embedded Linux computer that has found love in the workbenches of many hobbyists, engineers and developers. Operating at 1GHz, providing the possibility to have lots of memory (thanks to its microSD card slot) and access to the Internet, this tiny board is a quite powerful computer on its own. (It also looks great. Something about those rounded edges, probably) Its niche, however, is probably the fact that it features an absurd amount of input and output pins, along with several interfaces that allow different devices to be connected and different communication protocols to be used (you can see a list of those by the end of this post). This bridges the gap between the realms of computing and electronics, allowing to create complex and ambitious electronic projects — often interacting with the Web — while experiencing little to none software or hardware constraints.

Using RF 433MHz Transmitter/Receiver Module With Arduino

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This Article aims to be a comprehensive guide to the popular RF 433MHz Transmitter/Receiver modules. Information on how they work, some features, and an Arduino project example that you can take and apply to other projects.



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