Tag Archives: using

Raspberry Pi as a Hotspot/Access Point using ‘DHCP’

Raspberry Pi as Wireless Access Point
www.pdf24.org    Send article as PDF   

The Raspberry Pi can be used as a wireless access point, running a standalone network. This can be done using the inbuilt wireless features of the Raspberry Pi and even the Raspberry Pi ‘Zero W’, or by using a suitable USB wireless dongle that supports access points.

Note that this documentation was tested on a Raspberry Pi 3, and it is possible that some USB dongles may need slight changes to their settings. If you are having trouble with a USB wireless dongle, please check the forums.

In order to work as an access point, the Raspberry Pi will need to have access point software installed, along with DHCP server software to provide connecting devices with a network address. Ensure that your Raspberry Pi is using an up-to-date version of Raspbian is “Stretch“, or better (e.g. 2018-06-27-raspbian-stretch-lite.img).

Using Custom EV3-G MyBlock Icons Images

www.pdf24.org    Send article as PDF   

Introduction

In this tutorial, I will show you how to make custom MyBlock Icons, and MyBlock Parameter Icons. This is very useful because the MyBlock icons allow one to easily recognize in your programs. The tutorial is broken into two parts, MyBlock Icons, and Parameter Icons. You can only use this tutorial with the EV3-G software. The programs only display properly when you install your custom icons in the appropriate directory on your computer.

Before we begin, make a copy of the following directory: “..\LEGO MINDSTORMS Edu EV3\Resources\MyBlocks\images.

Using the TCS230/TCS3200 Color Sensor with an Arduino

TCS3200 Color Sensor Module
www.pdf24.org    Send article as PDF   

In this article I will endeavour to show how to detect colours with an Arduino connected to the TCS230/TCS3200 colour sensor.

The TCS3200 colour sensor can detect a wide variety of colours based on their wavelength. This sensor is specially useful for colour recognition projects such as colour matching, colour sorting, test strip reading and much more.

LEGO Mindstorms EV3 Ball Chasing Robot using the PixyCAM

PixyCAM Follow the Ball
www.pdf24.org    Send article as PDF   
This article aims to describe how to programme a LEGO Mindstorms EV3 robot that chases things, like a ball in this example. It’s the same robot and program that’s used in the PixyCAM Video below. This robot and program is a good launching point for other projects, and it’s a good introduction to PID control, which is used throughout robotics and engineering in general.

Guide to using the PixyCAM Camera’s EV3-G Blocks

www.pdf24.org    Send article as PDF   
In this article, I attempt to describe the LEGO PixyCAM block, which is used in conjunction with the LEGO Mindstorms EV3 Software. Check out the “Getting Started with the LEGO Mindstorms & the PixyCAM” Article for information on how to install the PixyCAM modules (Blocks) into Mindstorms EV3-G Software.

Connecting the PixyCAM to LEGO Mindstorms using I2C

www.pdf24.org    Send article as PDF   
In order to use the PixyCAM with the LEGO Mindstorms EV3 or NXT kit, you will need an I2C Adapter Cable. You can order a cable through some PixyCAM distributors, including the Robotshop. The PixyCAM for LEGO Mindstorms comes with a special Pixy-to-Mindstorms Cable, and is preloaded with a version of the firmware that speaks with the LEGO protocol by default. If you have Pixy for LEGO, just to the PixyMon Settings section below.

Using the ‘Google Cloud Vision API’ with your Raspberry Pi

www.pdf24.org    Send article as PDF   

What is the ‘Google Cloud Vision API’?

Google Cloud Vision API enables your robot to understand the content of an image by encapsulating powerful machine learning models in an easy to use REST API. It quickly classifies images into thousands of categories such as “robot”, “elephant”, “flower”. It detects individual objects and faces within images. It capable of finding and reading printed words contained within images, and even determines the language it is written in. You can use it to build metadata for your image collection, and can be used to moderate offensive content through image analysis.
The Vision API enables you to detect different types of inappropriate content from adult to violent content. It analyzes images uploaded by the request, or integrate with your image storage on Google Cloud Storage.

Using WS2812B Addressable RGB LED Strips with Arduinos

www.pdf24.org    Send article as PDF   
This article is about my experiments with the WS2812B LED strip, which is an addressable RGB LED strip. This information should also work with other similar LED strips, such as strips of the WS28XX family, Neopixel strip, among others. The WS2812B addressable LED strip comes in several varieties that differ in size, sealant or LED density. Choose the one that best fits your purpose.

Using a 0.96 inch OLED Display with Arduino Microcontroller

0.96" OLED Display
www.pdf24.org    Send article as PDF   
In this article I will show how to use the small 0.96 inch OLED display with an Arduino Microcontoller board to build a very basic Weather Station.

Introduction to using the BMP180 barometric sensor with Arduino

bmp180 barometricsensor
www.pdf24.org    Send article as PDF   
The BMP180 barometric sensor (model GY-68) in the following two images is a very small module with 10mm x 10.1mm (0.039in x 0.043in) footprint. This guide is also applicable for other similar barometric sensors.

Using the HC-SR04 Ultrasonic Sensor with Arduino

HC-SR04
www.pdf24.org    Send article as PDF   
The working principle of an ultrasonic sensor is simple and use high-frequency sound waves that are evaluated when the sensor received back the waves. To determine the distance between the robot and object, the sensor measure the elapsed time between sending and receiving the waves.

Using Flask to Control Raspberry Pi GPIOs

www.pdf24.org    Send article as PDF   
With this project you can create a standalone web server with a Raspberry Pi that can toggle two LEDs. You can replace those LEDs with any output (like a relay or a transistor). In order to create the web server you will be using a Python microframework called Flask.

Parts Required

Here’s the hardware that you need to complete this project:

  • Raspberry Pi (any Pi should work, I recommend using Raspberry Pi 3) – view on eBay
  • SD Card (minimum size 8Gb and class 10) – view on eBay
  • Micro USB Power Supply – view on eBay
  • Ethernet cable or WiFi dongle
  • Breaboard – view on eBay
  • 2x LEDs
  • 2x 470Ω Resistors
  • Jumper wires

Using a Membrane Keypad with an Arduino

Membrane Keypad
www.pdf24.org    Send article as PDF   
With this tutorial, you will be learn to access any keypad, and have it interact with a microcontroller. You can salvage these keypads from old telephones or you can purchase them from most electronics store for less than $2. They come in wide variety of shapes and sizes. The most commons sizes are 3×4 and 4×4, and you can get keypads with with words, letters and numbers written on the keys.

ESP8266 Web Server using Arduino IDE

www.pdf24.org    Send article as PDF   
In this project you’ll create a standalone web server with an ESP8266 Wi-Fi Module that can toggle two LEDs.

Secure Access using MFRC522 RFID Reader with Arduino

www.pdf24.org    Send article as PDF   
This Article shows a simple example on how to use the MFRC522 RFID reader, with a quick overview of the specifications, and a demonstration project using an Arduino.



Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!