Tag Archives: Shell

Installing the Keyestudio Raspberry PI GPS Plate

Keyestudio GPS Plate
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This Keyestudio KS0216 Raspberry Pi GPS Plate (shield) features high performance and low power consumption. It utilizes the NEO-6M Module developed by U-blox. The GPS Module is connected through the 2*20 expansion pins of Raspberry Pi. It features a large size ceramic antenna, sending locating information to GPS through the serial port. It can track up to 8 satellites on 50 channels at high speed, and it produces very accurate location data.

Plug the GPS Plate into Raspberry Pi 3. Upload your code to Raspberry Pi 3, and you can find your exact location within a few meters. It also provides you with very accurate time! It can be used in car navigation, personal positioning, fleet management, navigation and so on.

Make a Raspberry Pi into a Anonymizing ‘TOR’ Proxy!

Tor + Onion + Raspberry Pi
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TOR: The Onion Router is software that enables you to use the internet anonymously. By setting up TOR on a Raspberry Pi you can create a network router that scrambles all of your internet connection.

Turning a Raspberry Pi into a TOR Router has suddenly become much more appealing with Governments changing laws enabling ISPs to track customer internet usage, and selling on the data to advertising companies.

Use a Raspberry Pi to set up a TOR Network Router. I choose a Raspberry Pi 3 specifically because it has built-in wireless networking (the Pi Zero W would work well in this regard too).

The Raspberry Pi connects to the TOR network. All you have to do is then connect the Raspberry Pi to your broadband network, and connect your device to the Raspberry Pi.

Raspberry Pi as a Hotspot/Access Point using ‘DHCP’

Raspberry Pi as Wireless Access Point
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The Raspberry Pi can be used as a wireless access point, running a standalone network. This can be done using the inbuilt wireless features of the Raspberry Pi and even the Raspberry Pi ‘Zero W’, or by using a suitable USB wireless dongle that supports access points.

Note that this documentation was tested on a Raspberry Pi 3, and it is possible that some USB dongles may need slight changes to their settings. If you are having trouble with a USB wireless dongle, please check the forums.

In order to work as an access point, the Raspberry Pi will need to have access point software installed, along with DHCP server software to provide connecting devices with a network address. Ensure that your Raspberry Pi is using an up-to-date version of Raspbian is “Stretch“, or better (e.g. 2018-06-27-raspbian-stretch-lite.img).



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