Category Archives: Raspberry Pi Hardware

Raspberry Pi ‘3 B+’ Review

A new PI is out, but is it a worth upgrade?

Before moving any further, it’s however important to note that this is not a brand-new product or a radical evolution of our beloved PI, but rather an incremental upgrade. So, if you’re still struggling to decide whether this upgrade is worth it, I’m here to help with some considerations.

Please note that we’re still testing the new Raspberry PI 3 B+, and those considerations are based on official statements of the Foundation, we’ll update this article as soon as our tests are done.

Raspberry PI 3B+

WHAT IS CHANGED

The hardware makeover of the Raspberry PI model 3 B+ covers basically 3 areas:

  • Slightly faster processor
  • Better thermal management
  • Networking

As we will see later, what really matters for us is indirectly related to point number 3: networking. But let’s see in detail all the 3 main upgrade areas.

Timelapse Photography with Raspberry Pi Zero

long-camera-adaptor-for-pi-zero

This tutorial will guide you through taking photos using a Pi Zero and camera, to make a simple timelapse-capturing device. Use it to make a timelapse of a plant growing with the delay set to a day, or the progress on your building work with hourly photos, or a soldering project with a photo every 5 seconds.

Enable the camera

This tutorial assumes you have already set up your OctoCam as per the instructions. If you’re using a camera and a Pi, make sure the camera is connected.

In the Terminal, type sudo raspi-config and press Enter. This will bring up a menu on the screen. You’ll need to press 5, then choose option 1 to enable the camera, and then choose yes. Once you finish with the menu you should get prompted to reboot. This needs doing!

How to build an AirPlay receiver with Raspberry Pi Zero

Raspberry Pi Zero

The number of things you can do with a Raspberry Pi is astounding. For a little over $35, you can create a networked media server for streaming all your digital movies to your TV or give your existing printer wireless capabilities. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

If you’ve yet to decide on what you want to do with your Raspberry Pi, this project shows you how to turn it into a Chromecast Audio-like music streamer. This means you could set up several Raspberry Pis this way, connect each one to a speaker, place them around your house and stream music to each those speakers remotely in a highly configurable way. You can control the music from your phone, tablet or computer.

Build a Raspberry Pi Streaming Music Player

Pi MusicBox

In this tutorial, I will be going through steps to making your very own Raspberry Pi music player. This process is pretty straightforward, so you shouldn’t come across any problems at all.

For this project, I am going to be using a pre-built software package called the Pi Musicbox. This software contains plenty of features & functionality that make it great as a Music player.

This project is a headless music player so you will need to use a different device to be able to control it. The good thing is you can pretty much use any device that has a browser to be able to interact with it.

pHAT DAC for Raspberry Pi Zero

If you want to see how to do this visually, then be sure to check out my full video below. It goes through all the steps to getting this setup and working correctly in no time at all. If you do like the video be sure to subscribe, so you stay up to date.

24-bit, 192KHz Audio for the Raspberry Pi Zero with the pHAT

pHAT DAC for Raspberry Pi Zero

The pHAT provides a super affordable high-quality DAC for your Raspberry Pi. It pumps out 24-bits at 192KHz from the Raspberry Pi’s I2S interface on its 2×20 pin GPIO header.

Use pHAT DAC to build a tiny, lush-sounding streaming music device, or use it with Scroll pHAT to make a beautiful spectrum analyser!

Features

  • 24-bit audio at 192KHz
  • Line out stereo jack
  • Optional landing for dual RCA phono connector
  • PCM5102A DAC over the Raspberry Pi’s I2S interface
  • pHAT DAC pinout
  • Compatible with Raspberry Pi 3B+, 3, 2, B+, A+, Zero, and Zero W
  • Female header requires soldering

WS2812 Addressable LEDs: Raspberry Pi Quick-start Guide

This tutorial is aimed at getting some instant gratification from your WS2812 LEDs (trade name: neopixels). I’ll briefly cover a bare-bones setup for Raspberry Pi.

If you’ve never used a Raspberry Pi before, we’ve got you covered with our free, online Raspberry Pi How-To’s.

Temperature Sensing With Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi lacks analogue input, and while it’s possible to use an Analogue to Digital Converter (ADC), the DS18B20 is a fantastic, easy to use digital sensor that uses the Dallas 1 wire communication interface. Fortunately for us, the Raspberry Pi comes with built in software handling for 1 wire sensors which makes using sensors such as the DS18B20 pretty straightforward.

What is 1-Wire Communication

The Dallas 1-Wire protocol is a method of serial communication designed for simple communication between 1 Master and multiple Slave devices. Serial communication means that data is sent bit-by-bit along a single data line.

1 wire communication is most commonly used for temperature sensors, EEPROM chips, and other simple devices. Unlike other serial communication protocols such as I2C, which allows for device IDs/addresses to be assigned and handled by the master device, 1 wire devices have an unchangeable, factory set device ID. By differentiating between unique device IDs, you can chain multiple slave devices on a single data bus.

Setup Raspberry Pi Zero with Headless WiFi

Raspberry Pi Zero
The following instructions will work anytime, you don’t necessarily have to follow them for the first boot – this is just a very convenient way to get your Raspberry Pi onto a network without using any plug-in peripherals like a keyboard, mouse or monitor.

What is “headless,” anyway?

A computer setup without a monitor is said to be running headless. You might want to do this if you’re installing your Pi into some project, or want to keep power-usage and cost minimal. This kind of setup is what the Pi Zero W was built for. The idea is that you can still access your Pi’s terminal interface over your network using a protocol called SSH.

All we need to do is get our Pi set up with the right WiFi credentials and we’ll be able to remotely access it through a terminal program, as if we were using the terminal Pi’s own desktop. What’s more, we’ll get our Pi connected to WiFi without ever having to plug in a monitor, keyboard or mouse to configure it.

Using Flask to Control Raspberry Pi GPIOs

With this project you can create a standalone web server with a Raspberry Pi that can toggle two LEDs. You can replace those LEDs with any output (like a relay or a transistor). In order to create the web server you will be using a Python microframework called Flask.

Parts Required

Here’s the hardware that you need to complete this project:

  • Raspberry Pi (any Pi should work, I recommend using Raspberry Pi 3) – view on eBay
  • SD Card (minimum size 8Gb and class 10) – view on eBay
  • Micro USB Power Supply – view on eBay
  • Ethernet cable or WiFi dongle
  • Breaboard – view on eBay
  • 2x LEDs
  • 2x 470Ω Resistors
  • Jumper wires

How to connect & use a VGA Monitor with Raspberry PI

Raspberry Pi to VGA Mnitor
For a while I have been looking into a compact Video Monitor to use with a Raspberry or Banana PI. Whilst in a opportunity shop looking for a couple of 12V, 2A+ plus powersupply, I discovered what appeared to be a brand new Dell E196FPf 19″ LCD Computer Monitor for a mere $10. I couldn’t resist. Although it is a 19″ Monitor, the display isn’t widescreen and measures 410mm x 340mm. This results in a reasonably compact footprint.

Using OpenCV with the Raspberry Pi Camera

OpenCV RasPi CSI Camera
OpenCV doesn’t work natively with the Rasperry Pi Camera as it is not a usb-webcam. That said, the applications such as raspivid or raspistill controls the Raspberry Pi Camera using MMAL Functions. So the one needs to modify the source code of these applications, by using the Buffer Memory of the Raspberry Pi Camera Board to be feed to OpenCV as Image Objects.

Introducing the ‘ARMinARM’ board for the Pi Family

ARMin
The ARMinARM board is an STM32 ARM Cortex-M3 microcontroller add-on board for the Raspberry Pi Model B+ with a focus on flexibility and hackability, while still being easy to use. The STM32 runs on 72MHz and has 512KB Flash and 64KB SRAM memory.

Give the Raspberry Pi B+ SATA, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth & More..

Supstronics X300
I have been patiently waiting the release of the new Raspberry Pi B+ Expansion Board from Suptronics, the X300 for the last couple of months.The X300 is Raspberry Pi B+ Expansion Board that adds WiFi, Bluetooth, RTC, Microphone input, 3.3W Stereo Audio & SPDIF output, IR receiver, SATA and More.

Connecting an Arduino to a Raspberry PI using I2C

Raspberry Pi connected to Arduino via I2C
I’m intending to use several Arduino Boards as a cheap means of controlling a number of RFID Readers which will be used to detect the position of Locomotive Engines on my LEGO Train Layout. That said I need a way of connecting these Arduinos to the Raspberry Pi which is the Master Controller for the layout.
The easiest way of Connecting an Arduino to a Raspberry PI is using USB, however the PI’s USB ports are need for WiFi Keyboard, Mouse, etc. So in many cases USB is out, especially if you are using a Raspberry Pi Model ‘A’.

Raspberry Pi ‘Plate’ or Add-on with 16 Ch. Servo & 16 Ch. GPIO

Pridopia Pi-9685-23017
Over 12 months ago I came across a “I2C: 16 Channel, 12 bit PMW Servo & I2C 23017, 16 GPIO” add-on board for the Raspberry Pi made by a U.K. company called, Pridopia. At the time I thought too myself, “What a great idea”, but I had no immediate use for one. That has since changed thanx to my Raspberry Pi powered ‘LEGO Train Layout‘ I’m currently constructing.



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