Monthly Archives: August 2018

Raspberry PI: Connecting a Neo-6M  GPS Module

Neo-6M GPS Module
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I built a project using a Neo-6M  GPS Module with the Raspberry PI. Now there are several USB solutions, and apps that work with them, but I wanted to show how to use a $20 GPS module with a a serial UART, and Python code to decode the NMEA strings. Then you can write your own GPS interface, or combine the data with Google Maps.

Hardware Setup:

The first step is to connect the GPS module to the Raspberry PI. There are only 4 wires involved, so it’s a simple connection.

Streaming Video with the Raspberry Pi Zero W & Pi Camera

IR-CUT Camera Module
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I needed a really tiny yet cheap camera so I thought of the Raspberry Pi Camera module. The Version 2 Camera Module does 8MP with good quality, although a 5MP  IR-Cut Camera better suited my needs.

About the IR-CUT Camera

The IR-CUT Camera works on Normal Mode by default. There are two ways to toggle between Normal Mode and Night-vision Mode.

1. By editing the config.txt<code> file:

and append:

exit with save and restart your Pi then the camera will work on Night-vision Mode.

Run a Program On Your Raspberry Pi At Startup

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The method that I usually use to run a program on your Raspberry Pi at startup is to use the file rc.local. In order to have a command or program run when the Pi boots, you can add commands to the rc.local file. This is especially useful if you want to power up your Pi in headless mode (that is without a connected monitor), and have it run a program without configuration or a manual start.

Editing rc.local

On your Pi, edit the file /etc/rc.local using the editor of your choice. You must edit it with root permissions:

Add commands to execute the python program, preferably using absolute referencing of the file location (complete file path are preferred). Be sure to leave the line exit 0 at the end, then save the file and exit. In nano, to exit, type Ctrl-x, and then Y.

Make a “Safe Shutdown” Button for Raspberry Pi

Shutdown Button
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Pulling the power to your Raspberry Pi can cause image corruptions & other issues that can damage your Pi! In this article, we will create a small push button that will work as a ‘Safe-Shutdown’ option. We’ll connect it to our Raspberry Pi using the GPIO pins and some jumper wires, and with a few lines of code, we will have our own power switch!

First, we are going to look at a simple way to wire a button to the Pi GPIO connector. We will then write a python script that will shut down the Pi safely. The final step will be to setup the Pi so that the button will work all the time. Let’s Get started!



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